March Virtual Events

We’ve created our March virtual events with you in mind!

Planning for your future right now can be confusing and overwhelming, and it’s not always easy to anticipate the needs of older family members or loved ones with a disability. Our complimentary virtual programs will cover estate planning, communication with family, care advocacy, legal options and more.

We hope you’ll join our virtual discussions for support and guidance as you plan for the years ahead, and advocate on your loved one’s behalf.

Check out our programs below!
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Special Needs Insights – Retirement Planning

Hickman & Lowder Co., L.P.A. is excited to continue our Special Needs Insights series. Our short videos are designed to help you expand your awareness, reduce your stress and redefine what is possible as you advocate for your loved one.

This Week’s Insight: Planning for Retirement

Attorney Ethan Welch provides tips on planning for retirement when you have an adult child with a disability.

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Attorney David Banas Featured in Cleveland Jewish News

Attorney David S. BanasAttorney David Banas was featured in the CJN article Planning for Disabled Dependents Key in Estate Plan where he discusses how the planning process becomes even more vital to those who have a beneficiary with special needs.  “If something were to happen and mom and dad, who are the caregivers, there would be someone able to make decisions on their behalf with the ability to also go out and organize care for the disabled loved one,”

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Hickman & Lowder Introduces Special Needs Insights

Hickman & Lowder Co., L.P.A. is excited to share its Special Needs Insights series. We will regularly be sharing short videos to help you expand your awareness, reduce your stress and redefine what is possible as you advocate for your loved one.

This week’s insight: Special Needs Planning

In our first installment of Special Needs Insights, Attorney David Banas stresses the need for a vision, taking small steps and building your plan from there..

 

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FAQ: Medicaid Planning

What are the basic asset rules of Medicaid eligibility?

Are there any penalties for transferring assets?

Are there any exceptions to the Transfer Penalty?

Is there an application process?

Do I have to pay Medicaid back?

What are the basic asset rules of Medicaid eligibility?
In Ohio, Medicaid is administered by the Department of Job and Family Services (the DJFS). However, in order to qualify for federal reimbursement, the state program must comply with applicable federal statutes and regulations. So the following explanation includes both Ohio and federal law as applicable. The basic rule of nursing home Medicaid eligibility is that an unmarried applicant may have no more than $2,000 in “countable” assets in his or her name. “Countable” assets generally include all belongings except for (1) personal possessions, such as clothing, furniture, and jewelry, (2) one motor vehicle, (3) the applicant’s principal residence (if it is in Ohio), and (4) assets that are considered inaccessible for one reason or another. Prior to applying for Medicaid, an applicant can spend down “countable” assets by purchasing items or services for his or her benefit, such as clothing, a television or furnishings for the nursing home room, medical appliances not routinely covered by Medicaid or only covered at a minimal level (such as hearing aides, dental care), an irrevocable pre-need burial plan, care coordination, legal services, etc. [Top of Page]

Are there any penalties for transferring assets?
The other major rule of Medicaid eligibility is the penalty for transferring assets.

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