Revocable Trust or Irrevocable Trust: What is the Best Option for Me?

Trusts are great tools for you to pass assets to your heirs, whether that be to children, other family members, or charities. However, not all trusts are created equally. Sometimes, we use revocable trusts for one client, while another client established an irrevocable trust. When does it make sense to use a revocable trust compared to an irrevocable trust?

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Caregiver Mental Health During COVID-19

AARP recently released findings of a study that analyzed over 236,000 cases of individuals diagnosed with COVID-19. The study indicates that up to one-third of survivors suffer from psychiatric or neurological illnesses within six months of infection, with 34% of those further diagnosed with mental health or neurological disorders. The most common conditions were mood and anxiety disorders, but it also identified a higher rate of insomnia, dementia, and even encephalitis.

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Attorney Ethan Welch’s Estate Planning Article is Featured in The Morning Journal’s Senior Living Edition

Attorney Ethan Welch had his blog Should I Share My Estate Planning Information with My Family featured in the Senior Living tab for The Morning Journal’s July Edition. Ethan states “there is no right or wrong answer when it comes to sharing estate plan information, and some approaches may work better than others”.

 

 

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Medicaid and Your Home

One of the most common questions I get asked is if Medicaid is going to take the home. For many families, their home is their most valuable asset. But even if you have assets worth more, you probably don’t have the same emotional attachment to your retirement account as you do to your home. It’s easy to see why! You live in your home for many years, and your time there is full of memories. The thought of Medicaid forcing you to leave your home is frightening. Unfortunately, a lot of bad information is out there about Medicaid and your home. So let me be clear: Medicaid will not take your home. Hopefully, this blog post helps you better understand how Medicaid treats your home, how you can protect your home from Medicaid spend-down, and how to be ‘Medicaid smart’ if you do decide to sell your home.

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Medicaid and Medicare Working Together

Medicaid and Medicare are the two largest publicly funded health programs in the country with different missions that often overlap. Medicare provides health coverage to seniors and some individuals with disabilities. Medicaid covers adults and children who cannot afford insurance, or who have health care costs they cannot afford. Often, an individual will be eligible for coverage through both programs. Today, I will focus on how both programs work together by answering some commonly asked questions.

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Paying For Long-Term Care

Long-term care is not just nursing home care, like many of us think. I often speak about the “Elder Care Continuum”, which describes what many of us and our loved ones will or are experiencing as we age or face health challenges. In the beginning you may have little to no real limitations, reside in your home with no cost of care, and have private insurance through Medicare and various compliments. As you continue to age and some health issues arise, perhaps you’ll need to pay for some in-home assistance, which may be covered or paid for by VA Benefits, community services, or private caretakers. As your needs become greater and limitations increase, perhaps a move into a retirement community becomes more appropriate, funded by Social Security and retirement income.

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Medicaid for Beginners: 5 Facts about Ohio Medicaid

Everyone has heard of Medicaid. It is one of the largest health insurance providers in Ohio and covers individuals and families who don’t have insurance and can’t afford to buy it. More than 2.9 million people in Ohio get health insurance through Medicaid every year. But did you know that Medicaid is much more than health insurance for the poor? Here are five facts about Medicaid that might surprise you.

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Thoughtful Estate Planning Brings Protection and Peace of Mind

Estate planning begins with an exercise of the mind – an uncomfortable internal question and answer session.  What happens to my assets when I die?  Who will manage my money if I’m in the hospital or a nursing home?  For many, answering these questions is difficult and uncomfortable.  Sometimes people don’t have relatives to leave their assets with or to name as a power of attorney.  Sometimes they have relatives, but they can’t trust them or don’t get along with them.

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Take Simple Steps Early to Protect Your Most Important Asset: The Family Home

On August 1, 2016, Ohio changed its Medicaid regulations regarding the treatment of the home. Federal and State Medicaid laws recognize that the family home is often times the largest asset of an individual, and Medicaid rules account for the reality that the family home is critical to the well-being of a spouse, a child, or other family members. Still, the changes in the law make protection of the house even more difficult and cumbersome. Now more than ever, early planning involving the relatively simple act of transferring the home into an irrevocable trust can ensure that the home will remain in the family for generations, regardless of the need for long-term care.

Medicaid defines the “Home” as any real property in which an individual has an ownership interest and is the individual’s principal place of residence. A “principal place of residence” is the home to which a person would intend to return if they were absent, like in the case of a stay in a rehab facility or a nursing home.

Generally, the family home that is considered the principal place of residence by an individual or a married couple is an excluded resource, regardless of value. However, the new rules state that the home is no longer considered to be the principal place of residence and will be countable if the individual does not intend to return home. However, the rule states that a “temporary” absence from the home does not affect the exclusion of the home as

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